Quotes chapters 5-7

“I assumed the adults at court—my father in particular—were blind to the suffering of others. Later, I realised this was not the case. They were not blind to suffering they were embarrassed by it.”
Verne, Chapter Five

“They convinced themselves it was wrong to draw attention to any disparity between people so rather than acknowledge the beggar on the corner huddled in his blankets or the mad woman talking to herself, rather than entertain the possibility that a mother could abuse her daughter, they feigned apathy and in doing so were collectively guilty.”
Verne, Chapter Five

“Knowledge trumps ignorance, I realised. Bravery and a few moments of discomfort now for happiness later are preferable to immediate happiness and long-term suffering.”
Verne, Chapter Five

“Grief is…it’s like a wound. At first you think you’ll never recover. It cuts so deep your mind goes blank and you are aware of only the pain. You become bitter and angry. You blame yourself. You blame the gods, may they forgive us. But in time the pain recedes. You may not want it to—you may try to hold onto it because you fear losing the pain is like losing the person you mourn—but it happens whether you like it to or not. It has to happen. Otherwise you stop living.”
Harryet, Chapter Five

“I noticed him the way one might notice a fine painting hung in an otherwise drab hallway. I wanted to stop beneath it and simply appreciate its beauty. I wanted to hang it in my room.”
Verne, Chapter Five

“I fell in love with Drayk’s story first. For many, especially those from the mainland, a man’s story is like an old pair of boots: familiar, moulded to fit. In Tibuta a man rarely tells his story. His was unique and I wanted it all for myself.  I fell in love with his body second and thirdly, though this was more enduring, his mind.”
Verne, Chapter Five

“Over the next few weeks Elef introduced me to parts of the city I never knew existed…He taught me to open my ears and nose. He taught me to really feel Tibuta, to love his city.”
Verne, Chapter Five

“I know stories from the mainland. I know the way they are supposed to progress, the way a wounded damsel in distress is supposed to be swept off her feet by a charming prince. I wanted the next few hours to play out like a Caspian fairy-tale.”
Verne, Chapter Seven

“The last Tempest of Typhon was trapped on our side when the Elysian Gate was shut. It started as a mere breath of air in the clouds. But over the millennia it grew and now it is said to be moving across the earth, destroying everything in its path.”
The high priestess, Chapter Seven

“When the Tempest comes the great agricultural tracts will produce no grain. The rising seas will produce no fish. The orchards will produce neither syrup nor wine. The gathering clouds will not rain. The masgurum will not grow. He who sleeps on the roof will die on the roof. He who sleeps in the house will have no burial. The seas will rise and consume the lands. The air will suck the earth into its lungs. People will flail themselves from hunger. They will flail themselves from thirst. But still the Tempest will come.”
The high priestess, Chapter Seven